Beginners Training

February 15, 2014

What is Fluff?

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Written by: Metalforever, Peebrain, Miri

What is Fluff?

“Fluff” means outrageous untrue things which people say to sound cool or experienced, websites made by newbies who ask how to do <insert ability here> and then proceed to put it on their website, methods about how to do “super-duper-french-fry kinesis”, and/or anything to do with “lentation”, and in the “majority” of cases, public sparring communities and chat channels.

Also, please note that the definition of “fluff” could vary depending on who you speak to and on which communities you are a part of.  Some communities may see something as truly “viable”, while others see it as complete nonsense.  Make sure you get a second opinion, do research, and come to your own conclusions.

A fluffbunny can be defined as an individual who says and supposedly does things which are hard to believe.

Why Should We Care?

Fluffbunnies tend to do the following things:

A.  Make outrageous claims about his/her ability without any sort of “proof” to back it up, or claims to be able to do something he/she can’t actually do.

This is a problem because individuals that truly wish to learn the material may be unintentionally misinformed.  Under the best case scenario, they don’t bother trying Psionics because they see it as ridiculous.  Under the worst-case scenario, you have someone that honestly believes they can do the outrageous things they claim, and they attempt to misdirect well-meaning new practitioners into what can only be considered as “delusional” forms of practice and thought.  

B.  Refuses to read articles, learn, practice, or think for his/herself and/or ask question(s) in the forums or chat about anything “thoroughly” covered in the beginners section.
This is a problem because if these people can’t even read the material we so graciously provided for free in the beginners and the other article sections, how can they be expected to take our advice and actually complete the exercises they are asked to?  These people rarely, if ever, go far in Psionics, and tend to be a drain on the community and its limited resources.  

C.  Is always right, even when he/she is obviously misguided.
This is a problem because these people may attempt to teach new practitioners “misguided” information. These individuals also rarely, if ever, bother to consider the opinions of others. Use your own imagination to determine why this is bad from a “checking your sources” perspective.

D. Takes one source of Psionic abilities on the internet as “gospel”, and refuses to check for multiple sources and/or refuses to do own research.
Long term, this is a bad because if the person progresses far enough in his/her skills to be able to “teach” others, him/her may disclaim ideas that are perfectly viable when teaching new practitioners.  Short term, this is bad because the source he/she is getting his/her information from could be “inaccurate”, or even “fluffy” .  Furthermore, it is generally “accepted” within the community that there are multiple ways to do different things, and if one method doesn’t work, one is expected by the site staff to try some other methods that are contained on this website, or else ware within the community.  This is also a problem because the person in question is gaining his/her knowledge from a very “narrow” viewpoint.  Truthfully, not every topic is covered on this website(not nearly), and the same situation exists with many other websites, so you are encouraged to gain your information from multiple communities.

E. Makes up terms to describe his/her practice regimen just to sound “cool”.  Biokinesis, geokinesis, shadow-kinesis, or super-duper-french-fry kinesis are examples of this.
Generally, what individuals describe as “geokinesis” or other related kinesises(like “pyrokinesis” or “cryokinesis”) can also be described, and perhaps more efficiently, as “psychokinesis (telekinesis) with fire, psychokinesis with ice, psychokinesis with the earth, or psychokinesis with <insert the medium you are actually working with here>.  As a general rule(but certainly not exclusively), the people using these terms to describe their “abilities” or “experiences” are under 18 years of age, have less than 6 months of experience, are gaining their information from somewhere that is not accurate, or are claiming to have abilities that they do not actually possess. Most of the time, different terms are “invented” by these individuals in an attempt to sound “cool” or “elite”.  Use of these terms are also discouraged because, frankly, they confuse new practitioners.

Why Should You Care?

Most or all of the scenarios above could be detrimental to your progress as a psychic practitioner.  “Fluff” is misinformation, at its best, and leads towards delusional thought, at worst.  You should take preventative measures to make sure that the places you are getting your information from are considered to be “accurate”. When in doubt, always double check the information you receive.  Also, they make us look bad.yes

How to Spot Fluff or Fluffbunnies

> Invents -kinesis terms for the purpose of an article, forum post, or during a chat session.
> Varies *greatly* from information available on other well-known communities.
> Claims to be able to teach you but appears to have less than 1.5 years of experience, even if he/she claims to have more years of experience.
> Uses large words in an attempt to sound impressive, but doesn’t actually make any sense.
> Claims to be able to do something miraculous when staff members or other members known to have verified “ability” are unable to verify that the person in question has any sort of skill whatsoever.
> A website with materials stolen from other websites without credit or permission.
> A community that does not have stringent terms on who they decide to hire as staff.
> Sparring channels with people staffed that can’t verify their ability to a 3rd party, or most public sparring channels in general.
> Members of the community in question seem to make outrageous claims which are left unquestioned a lot more often than members of other communities.

Closing Remarks

This article was written in an attempt to prevent you from becoming misinformed, to help you understand why the staff frown upon certain comments within the community, and to help you spot when a community has gone wrong.  It is my hope that you will take the advice contained herein and decide to become a more informed person before making a forum post, or to point out outrageous displays of fluff behavior where others might miss it.

-Metalforever, 2012



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